Steam error on launch: OpenGL GLX context is not using direct rendering

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If you are having this error when launching steam, and follow the steps on the link provided by the dialog, most probably you have a 64bit system and some problem with your 32bit drivers.

In my case, I had this problem with my Intel 4000HD card. First of all, you need to know what’s happening, for know that, you must run glxinfo:

glxinfo | grep OpenGL
OpenGL vendor string: Intel Open Source Technology Center
OpenGL renderer string: Mesa DRI Intel(R) Ivybridge Mobile
OpenGL core profile version string: 3.3 (Core Profile) Mesa 10.2.3
OpenGL core profile shading language version string: 3.30
OpenGL core profile context flags: (none)
OpenGL core profile profile mask: core profile
OpenGL core profile extensions:
OpenGL version string: 3.0 Mesa 10.2.3
OpenGL shading language version string: 1.30
OpenGL context flags: (none)
OpenGL extensions:
OpenGL ES profile version string: OpenGL ES 3.0 Mesa 10.2.3
OpenGL ES profile shading language version string: OpenGL ES GLSL ES 3.0
OpenGL ES profile extensions:

It seems so far so good… but wait, I’ve just run 64bit version of glxinfo, so the information could be wrong. First thing I did was install glxinfo32, located on lib32-mesa-demos

$ yaourt -S lib32-mesa-demos

Once installed, I executed the right command

glxinfo32 | grep OpenGL
libGL error: dlopen /usr/lib32/xorg/modules/dri/i965_dri.so failed (/usr/lib32/xorg/modules/dri/i965_dri.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory)
libGL error: unable to load driver: i965_dri.so
libGL error: driver pointer missing
libGL error: failed to load driver: i965
OpenGL vendor string: VMware, Inc.
OpenGL renderer string: Gallium 0.4 on llvmpipe (LLVM 3.4, 256 bits)
OpenGL core profile version string: 3.3 (Core Profile) Mesa 10.2.3
OpenGL core profile shading language version string: 3.30
OpenGL core profile context flags: (none)
OpenGL core profile profile mask: core profile
OpenGL core profile extensions:
OpenGL version string: 3.0 Mesa 10.2.3
OpenGL shading language version string: 1.30
OpenGL context flags: (none)
OpenGL extensions:
OpenGL ES profile version string: OpenGL ES 3.0 Mesa 10.2.3
OpenGL ES profile shading language version string: OpenGL ES GLSL ES 3.0
OpenGL ES profile extensions:

Well, VMWare? No idea why it’s saying this! But anyway, I’ve just find the problem, I need to install the needed intel 32bit drivers, lib32-intel-dri

$ yaourt -S lib32-intel-dri

Let’s try once again to see the results

glxinfo32 | grep OpenGL
OpenGL vendor string: Intel Open Source Technology Center
OpenGL renderer string: Mesa DRI Intel(R) Ivybridge Mobile x86/MMX/SSE2
OpenGL core profile version string: 3.3 (Core Profile) Mesa 10.2.3
OpenGL core profile shading language version string: 3.30
OpenGL core profile context flags: (none)
OpenGL core profile profile mask: core profile
OpenGL core profile extensions:
OpenGL version string: 3.0 Mesa 10.2.3
OpenGL shading language version string: 1.30
OpenGL context flags: (none)
OpenGL extensions:
OpenGL ES profile version string: OpenGL ES 3.0 Mesa 10.2.3
OpenGL ES profile shading language version string: OpenGL ES GLSL ES 3.0
OpenGL ES profile extensions:

Yay! Let’s play something!! 🙂

 

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qtDesigner does not start

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I’m starting to playing with desktop interfaces, I use KDE and I like a lot Qt controls. Furthermore, are multiplatform, so combined with python I can do beautilful programs in a easy way.

So I’d installed Qt4 Designer on my work’s laptop. But when I clicked on the Qt4 Designet icon, nothing happened.

I opened a terminal and run designer-qt in order to see what happened. This is what I saw:

$ designer-qt4
designer-qt4: symbol lookup error: /usr/lib/qt4/plugins/designer/libqscintillaplugin.so: undefined symbol: _ZN13QsciScintillaC1EP7QWidget

Pretty weird, it seems something wrong with scintilla. So after reinstalling qscintilla and see that not solved my issue, I tried to recompile from sources instead of reinstalled

$ yaourt -S qscintilla –build

(please note that there are two hyphen (-) before the buid parameter)

Once finished, designer-qt started smoothly 🙂

sudo command ask for a password even with the NOPASSWD condition

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After a hardware problems with my hard disk, I decided to get rid of it and install arch o a new hard disk.

After setting up the graphical environment, one of the configuration I like for my personal computer, discouraged for servers, is to configure sudo for not to ask for my password in each bash session. As said, it’s not recommended to do this, but I’m too lazy to put my password again and again.

So, as you may already know, in order to say to sudo command do not ask for the user password, it execute as root the visudo command and let the user or the group to execute all commands without password.

If you want to your user (malevolent in my case) to execute all sudo command withou password, you must type this when visudo opens.

malevolent ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL

Perhaps your user belongs to the wheel group, so you can give to the entire group those rights, but this is even less recommended.

%wheel ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL

In both cases, today I faced a new problem. The system continued asking me for my password. Ignoring those entries.

Looking the visudo documentation, it says:

When multiple entries match for a user, they are applied in order.  Where there are multiple matches, the last match is used (which is not  necessarily the most specific match).

So I look my entries with the following command

$ sudo -l
User malevolent may run the following commands on malevolo:
(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL
(ALL) ALL

An it seems that the nopasswd entry is ignored by the all entry. So including my user just below the root user inside sudoers, did not make the job. After placing the line

malevolent ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL

At the very end of the file, executing the last command now it returns:

$ sudo -l
User malevolent may run the following commands on malevolo:
(ALL) ALL
(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL

And now my system does not ask for my password.

Enable bash completion after sudo command

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If you usually work with the sudo command you will find yourself typing the entire command line after the first word: sudo. That’s pretty annoying and the solution, pretty straight forward.

First of all, we need to install bash-autocompletion package from extra repositories.

That’s all. 🙂

 

Kupfer, a convenient command and access tool

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Today let me show you a lovely piece of software. There are a lot quick launchers out there, but many of them or are somehow buggy or has an almost dead development cycle.

I tried by myself (I think) all of them, because I really hate put my hands out from the keyboard, and I finally get pleased with Kupfer.

For the lazies, see this awesome video tutorial, showing the coolest features.

More documentation can be found on its homepage.

Hope you enjoy it like me! 🙂